Jesuit Map, 1670's

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Jesuit Map, 1670's

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Jesuit Map, 1670s

This hand-drawn map - probably made by the Jesuits - was created before the Central Algonquian tribes returned to the Indiana region. (They left due to Iroquois raiding parties.)

Zoom in to the Lake Michigan area (Lac des Illinois.) Now look on its Western shores and notice the tribes listed there: Potawatomi (Pouteoutamie), Kickapoo (KiKbaou).

Region of the Upper Mississippi and the Great Lakes
Cartographer unknown, ca. 1670's
Courtesy of Winsor, Memorial map Collection, Harvard University Library

1688 Corenelii

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1688 Corenelii

Click on the image to zoom in to area south of Lake Michigan.

1688 Corenelii

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1688 Corenelii

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1688 Corenelii

This map shows Miami in the Indiana region and Potawatomi still west of Lake Michigan. Can you find them?

(hint: Click in the Lake Michigan (Lac Des Illinois) area to zoom in. Zoom in again on the area south of Lake Michigan. Click again, then zoom into its Western shore.)

Partie Occidentaie du Canada ou de la
Nouvelle France, Vincenzo Coronelii, 1688
Courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society

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Why do older maps look so different?

Early mapmakers based their work on stories and reports from the travels of explorers and surveyors. Often they copied older maps and repeated mistakes made by others. Slowly the maps became better as information was gathered from travelers, Native Americans, and other sources.

Did Native Americans make maps?

Yes they did make maps. There are examples of maps they drew on animal hides, sometimes at the request of European explorers. Often their key direction was not the North Pole, but the point of the rising sun in the east. They found their own way through familiarity with the locations of rivers, mountains, and valleys. The need to draw maps for their own use was more limited.

Jesuit Map, 1670's 1688 Corenelii

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Homann, 1725

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Homann, 1725

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Homann, 1725

Once peace was established with the Iroquois, more central Algonquian tribes began to move back to the Indiana region.

Zoom in to the Lake Michigan area (Lac des Illinois.) Now look on its Western shores and notice the tribes listed there: Potawatomi (Pouteoutamie), Kickapoo (KiKbaou).

Amplissimae regionis Mississipi [sic]
John Baptist Homann, Nuremberg, ca. 1725
Courtesy of the Indiana Historical Siociety

Click on the question to get the answer

Why do older maps look so different?

Early mapmakers based their work on stories and reports from the travels of explorers and surveyors. Often they copied older maps and repeated mistakes made by others. Slowly the maps became better as information was gathered from travelers, Native Americans, and other sources.

Did Native Americans make maps?

Yes they did make maps. There are examples of maps they drew on animal hides, sometimes at the request of European explorers. Often their key direction was not the North Pole, but the point of the rising sun in the east. They found their own way through familiarity with the locations of rivers, mountains, and valleys. The need to draw maps for their own use was more limited.

Homann, 1725

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Gibson, 1783

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Gibson, 1783

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Gibson, 1783

By 1783, the Delaware and the Shawnee had moved into the Indiana area. Can you find them? The Miami were sometimes called the Twightwee, for the sound that a crane makes. The crane is still an important symbol to Miamis today. Where were the Twightwee living in 1783? Click to zoom.

Gibson map, 1783
Courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society

Click on the question to get the answer

Why do older maps look so different?

Early mapmakers based their work on stories and reports from the travels of explorers and surveyors. Often they copied older maps and repeated mistakes made by others. Slowly the maps became better as information was gathered from travelers, Native Americans, and other sources.

Did Native Americans make maps?

Yes they did make maps. There are examples of maps they drew on animal hides, sometimes at the request of European explorers. Often their key direction was not the North Pole, but the point of the rising sun in the east. They found their own way through familiarity with the locations of rivers, mountains, and valleys. The need to draw maps for their own use was more limited.

Gibson, 1783

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Matthew Carey Map, 1801

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Matthew Carey Map, 1801

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Matthew Carey Map, 1801

This map shows lands owned by Native peoples and land owned by the U.S. government in 1801. Follow the red line that divides the "Indian lands" and the "Army lands." Click to zoom.

How much of present-day Indiana belonged to the Indians in 1801?

Matthew Carey Map, 1801
Courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society

Ohio and Indiana, 1823

Ohio and Indiana, 1823

This map was made about 25 years after the 1801 map of the Northwest Territory. In the 1801 map, all of present-day Indiana was marked "Indian lands." How much land is left to the Indians?

The northern part of Indiana still belonged to the tribes, but the southern part was divided into counties.

Ohio & Indiana (from Morse's atlas), 1823
Courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society

Matthew Carey Map, 1801

Land Ceded by the Potawatomi

By 1835, the government had forced the Potawatomi to give up much of their land. This map shows Northern Indiana near Chicago. How many places do you see the words "Ceded by Treaty?" This means the Potawatomi lost their land.

Map of Lands [in Illinois and Indiana] Ceded by the Potawatomies [sic] under Treaties of the 20th, 26th, and 27th of October 1832. Prepared in the GO and dated October 30, 1835.

Courtesy of the National Archives and Record Administration

Click on the question to get the answer

Why do older maps look so different?

Early mapmakers based their work on stories and reports from the travels of explorers and surveyors. Often they copied older maps and repeated mistakes made by others. Slowly the maps became better as information was gathered from travelers, Native Americans, and other sources.

Did Native Americans make maps?

Yes they did make maps. There are examples of maps they drew on animal hides, sometimes at the request of European explorers. Often their key direction was not the North Pole, but the point of the rising sun in the east. They found their own way through familiarity with the locations of rivers, mountains, and valleys. The need to draw maps for their own use was more limited.

Matthew Carey Map, 1801 Ohio and Indiana, 1823 Land Ceded by the Potawatomi

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