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Maumee River, ca. 1854

George Winter
Maumee River-Fort Miami
Graphite on paper, ca. 1854
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Bayou near Dayton, Ohio, ca. 1853

George Winter
Crossing a bayou- Miami River in the distance-vicinity of Dayton, Ohio
Wash on paper, ca. 1853
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Mississinewa River, ca. 1839

George Winter
Scene on the Mississinawa River
Ink and graphite on green paper, ca. 1839
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Lake Manitou, ca. 1839

George Winter
Lake Man-i-tou
Watercolor on paper, executed ca. 1863 - 71
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Wabash River, ca. 1841

George Winter
Scene on the Wabash near the Indian National Reserve
Graphite on paper, ca. 1841
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Eel River, ca. 1848

George Winter
Scene on the Eel River
Graphite on paper, ca. 1848
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Wild Cat Creek, ca. 1860

George Winter
Wild Cat Octr 29th 1860
Graphite on paper, ca. 1860
Courtesy of the Tippecanoe County Historical Association

Hocagra or Ho-Chunk
(Big Fish/Great Voice): Winnebago

Their original homelands are west of Lake Michigan in present-day Wisconsin. After they sold their homelands for lands in Minnesota, South Dakota and Nebraska, some moved there and some were able to use the 1862 Homestead Act to purchase back some of their land in Wisconsin.

Myaamiaki
(The Miami People): Miami

Once known as twaa twaa (the People of the Crane), the Miami were a central Algonquian tribe that lived in present-day Indiana and western Ohio region. Today, the Miami Nation of Indians of Indiana has offices in Peru, Indiana. The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, federally-recognized, has offices in Miami, Oklahoma.

Tamaro'wa
(Cut Tail): Tamaroa

The Tamaroa were members of a loose group of like speakers known as the "Illinois" who originally lived northwest of Cahokia. By 1700, one portion had become part of the Kaskaskia; another portion had become part of the Peoria. Today, the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Wea and Piankashaw are confederated with of the Peoria Tribe of Oklahoma.

Wawiggtenang
(Place of the Curved Channel): Wea

The Wea, along with the Piankashaw, were originally one tribe with the Miami. After separating into separate tribes (before contact with Europeans), they still maintained common language, kinship, culture and territory. During the Removal period, the Wea and Piankashaw moved West several times, eventually joining with Peoria Tribe in Oklahoma.

Sawanwa
(People of the South): Shawnee

Their original homelands of the Shawnee were probably in southern Ohio, but during the Fur Trade, they moved east to live with the Delaware. By 1760, they had returned to Ohio. Today, there are two federally-recognized tribes of Shawnee - one in Oklahoma, one in Missouri.

mihtohseenionki Logo

Where Do I Start?

This interactive map shows Indian influence on the Indiana region beginning in the 1600s. Select the "Audio icon Audio Narration" button on each screen for more information.

How do I use the map?

Learn how to say Mihtohseenionki:

  • Click on the title at the top of each screen.

Navigate the screens:

  • Use the menu bar (far left) and select the colored bars to move to a different time period.
  • Select "Objects," "Historical Maps," and "Do You Know" to find out more about each time period.

"Explore" the map:

  • The icons represent different communities. Select the symbol to find out more.
  • Select the small pictures to enlarge them.
  • Select to hear pronunciation of Native names of rivers and their English translation

We've always lived here - that's what our elders say. We only left our homelands for a short time hundreds of years ago. Iroquois warriors with guns chased us out -- they wanted all the beaver furs in the area to use for trade with the Europeans. In the late 1600's, we returned home to Mihtohseenionki - that is Miami for "the people's place."



Back to Map

Lake Michigan

Kihĉikami

(Miami-Illinois)
Big water

Kankakee River

mahweewaahkiki

(Miami-Illinois)
it is wolf land

Saint Joseph River (South Bend)

saakiiweesiipiiwi

(Miami)
Outlet river

Maunmee River

nameewa siipiiwi

(Miami-Illinois)
Sturgeon river

Eel River

kineepikomeekwa siipiiwi

(Miami-Illinois)
Eel river

Wabash River

waapaahšiiki siipiiwi

(Miami-Illinois)
It-shines-white river or white stone river

Great Miami River

ahsenisiipi

(Miami-Illinois)
Stone river

White River - West Fork

waapikamiiki

(Miami-Illinois)
It is white water

Ohio River

kaanseenseepiiwi

(Miami)
Kaw river

Why do Native words look different?

We use the same letters that you use in English, but since our words are pronounced differently the spelling might look different. We also have certain sounds in our language not found in English. For generations, we passed down our history by oral tradition. It was not until recently that we began writing our language down.

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Sandhill Crane Video: Rhoda Gerig, Videographer

Mihtohseenionki (The Peoples Place)

Produced by
The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in collaboration with The Polis Center and the Purdue University Department of Computer Technology and the Indiana University School of Informatics/New Media at IUPUI.

Project Managers
Tricia O'Connor, Eiteljorg Museum
Steven Sipe, Eiteljorg Museum
Cathy Burton, Eiteljorg Museum
James Nottage, Eiteljorg Museum
Kevin Mickey, The Polis Center
Joseph Defazio, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis
David Garner, graduate student, Department of Human Centered Computing, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis

Content Editors and Developers
Tricia O'Connor, Eiteljorg Museum
Steven Sipe, Eiteljorg Museum
Ray Gonyea, Eiteljorg Museum
Laura Browning, Eiteljorg Museum
Cathy Burton, Eiteljorg Museum
Kevin Mickey, The Polis Center
Joseph Defazio, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis
David Garner, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis

Designed and Authored by
David Garner, graduate student, Department of Human Centered Computing, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis
Cindy Lory, Media Arts and Science graduate, Department of Human Centered Computing, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis
Joseph Defazio, Associate Professor, Department of Human Center Computing, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis

In collaboration with
Myaamia Center, Miami University, OH

Based on research by
Michael McCafferty, who supplied the Native American place names and provided the trail and village site information based on his unpublished manuscript Native Names of Indiana.

Pronunciations provided by
Daryl Baldwin (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma), Director, Myaamia Center, Miami University, Ohio
Frank Barker (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi)
Michael McCafferty, linguist
Jim Rementer (Delaware), Director, Lenape Language Project, Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma
Dani Tippmann (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)

Audio narrations by
Jesse Marks (Miami Nation of Indiana)
Dani Tippmann (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)
Gloria Tippmann (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)
Greg Tippmann (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)
Mary Tippmann (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)
Aaron Horner (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi)
Audrey Horner (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi)

Background Music by
MusicWorx Publishing and élan Michaels
Trademarks owned exclusively by MusicWorx Publishing, Inc. Copyright ©1998,1999,2000,2001,2002 MusicWorx Publishing-All Rights Reserved

Sandhill Crane Video
Rhoda Gerig, Videographer
David Garner, Editor

Regional Advisory Council:
Carolyn Knauff (Miami Nation of Indiana)
Scott Shoemaker (Miami Nation of Indiana)
Don Secondine (Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma)
John Warren (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi)

Sponsored by
The map was made possible by a generous gift by the Eiteljorg Museum guides.